Logi sisse läbi:

Voulez-vous some SUIR or some SÕIR ce soir?

On the left is suir, a mass of pollen with added honey, packed into granules by worker bees to feed their young. Humans have also grown to appreciate the naturally fermented protein (valk) and vitamins found in bee pollen, also known as beebread. On the right is sõir, a homemade quark cheese (kohupiima/juust) that hails from Southern Estonia. It traditionally contains caraway seeds (köömned), but need not. Although you can purchase it at various markets all over Estonia, it's easy to make yourself. Suir photo by Riina Kindlam, sõir photo courtesy of Pille Petersoo, nami-nami.eeOn the left is suir, a mass of pollen with added honey, packed into granules by worker bees to feed their young. Humans have also grown to appreciate the naturally fermented protein (valk) and vitamins found in bee pollen, also known as beebread. On the right is sõir, a homemade quark cheese (kohupiima/juust) that hails from Southern Estonia. It traditionally contains caraway seeds (köömned), but need not. Although you can purchase it at various markets all over Estonia, it's easy to make yourself. Suir photo by Riina Kindlam, sõir photo courtesy of Pille Petersoo, nami-nami.eeHave you considered popping some suir as part of a healthier New Year's regime? Or tried sõir as an appetizer (eel/roog)? They're both made for consumption with great care and love.

When I first typed sõir into my internet search engine (otsingu/mootor), the only hits I got were for soir – evening in French. And I have to admit, I kept forgetting "that other word" (suir), that I've wanted to simultaneously introduce for a while, since it's so similar and most likely just as new to readers. Are they both fringe delicacies? Well, suir (bee pollen), also known as mesilaste leib (bee bread) is not eaten for its great taste. In fact it's kibe (bitter), some say hapu (sour) and magically, naturally hapendatud (fermented) by the bee's secret ingredient, an amazing lactic acid bacteria (piim/happe/bakter).

If you're not a beekeeper (mesinik), you're most likely not familiar with many apiarian (mesinduse) terms, but it's a fascinating world, that yields products renown for their preventative and healing properties. Royal jelly is mesilas/ema/toite/piim ("queen bee feeding milk"), propolis is taru/vaik ("hive resin"), pollen = õie/tolm ("blossom dust") and pollination = tolmeldamine ("dusting", as in stirring it up, not whisking tolm off furniture). The Estonian terms paint quite a clear picture... A human-built hive is a taru or mesi/puu (honey tree!), while the bee's architectural feat within, the honeycomb = kärg. The suir is actually meant as a feast for the growing larvae (vastsed, sing. vastne) inside the comb's brood cells (kärje/kannud).

The origin of the word suir, (genitive suira) is unknown, says the brand spanking new 6600 word Estonian Etymological i.e. word origin Dictionary (Eesti Keele Instituut, 2012). What is known, is that bee pollen contains large quantities of iron, cobalt, phosphorus and calcium and is one of the richest natural foods containing selenium (others being para/pähklid (Brazil nuts) and kreeka/pähklid (walnuts), which helps detoxify the body. Suir is also an excellent source of potassium, B-group vitamins and amino acids, which are predigested for easy assimilation in the ratio that the human body needs, boosting the production of red blood cells and hemoglobin. Others who could benefit are those suffering from complications (tüsistused) resulting from inflammation of the prostate gland (ees/nääre) and high cholesterol.

Sõir does not claim to have such healing properties (ravi/omadused), instead, there is the threat of swallowing your tongue, as per the Estonian expression "viib keele alla", meaning it's so yummy, it'll take your tongue down in tow. Sõir is made of milk, quark aka fresh or curd cheese (not cottage cheese, that's kodu/juust in Estonian), butter, eggs, salt and caraway seeds. Sõir is always served at jaanipäeva, i.e. midsummer festivities in South-Eastern Estonia, but not only. Making pasha for Easter is somewhat in the same ballpark, but sõir is made by heating the ingredients, pasha is prepared cold and is sweet. Nami-nami.ee has many alternate recipes for making sõir, encouraging adding basiilik (basil), küüs/lauk (garlic), päikse/kuivatatud tomatid (sun-dried tomatoes), karu/lauk (wild garlic), petersell (parsley) and jõhvikad (cranberries). My trusty etümoloogia sõna/raamat says the word comes from the old Russian syru or current syr meaning cheese. The Livonian (liivi) word is sõira and Votic word, i.e. used by Votes in Ingria (Ingerimaa vadjalased) is suura.

Local cosmopolitan food blogger Pille Petersoo wasn't quite sure where you can buy sõir in Tallinn. She insists it's so easy to prepare, she's never even thought of buying it ready-made. Try it for your next get-together on a piece of rye näki/leib (crisp bread) with some red pepper jelly and an introductory granule of superpower suir on top.

Riina Kindlam, Tallinn

Loe siit lisaks: Viimased lood

Musta lindi päev (Black Ribbon Day)

Musta lindi päev (Black Ribbon Day)

Kanadast alguse saanud musta lindi päeva, 23.augustit, päeva, mil 1939 kirjutati alla Molotovi-Ribbentropi pakt, tähistatakse täna mitmel pool...

Esimene koolikell – suve sümboolne lõpukell

Esimene koolikell – suve sümboolne lõpukell

Esimene koolikell on ühtlasi suvise elurütmi sümboolne lõpukell, ütles president Toomas Hendrik Ilves ühes oma kooliaasta avasõnumis. See kuts...

Black Ribbon Day, the saga finally in a book

Black Ribbon Day, the saga finally in a book

The book, Black Ribbon Day, has a special place in the history of Canadian Polish Research Institute, the publishers of the book. It pres...

Musumats

Musumats

No seda te keski nüid minust küll ei uskund, et akkan teile eesti keele kramatikat õpetama. Aga näe, akkan. Kõigepealt teen teile testi ja jut...

Palju õnne, Ülle!

Palju õnne, Ülle!

Reedel, 22. augustil pidas Toronto Eesti Maja kohvikus oma esimest juubelisünnipäeva Ülle Veltmann - üks Toronto eesti ühiskonna tuntumaid ja ...

Estonian language classes

Estonian language classes

Adult Estonian language classes available. New and returning students are welcome! Classes on Tuesdays from 7 - 9:10 at The Estonian House. Fo...

Uuriti Toronto elanike toetust linnapeakandidaatidele

Uuriti Toronto elanike toetust linnapeakandidaatidele

Neljapäeval teatati ajakirjanduses Forum Research'i poolt nädala algul läbi viidud telefoniküsitluse tulemustest, kus uuriti Toronto elanike a...

Erootikast ja lüürikast

Erootikast ja lüürikast

Teisipäeval, 19. augustil esines kirjandusteadlane Sirje Kiin Tartu College'i saalis loenguga teemal „Armastus ja seks eesti luules". Kõneleja...

Facebook Twitter Youtube Rss Google plus

Seoses Labour Day'ga
on Eesti Elu kontor
esmaspäeval,
1. septembril suletud.

 

 
 Uuri mida kirjutatakse

viimases Eesti Elu paberlehes!
Eesti Elu-Estonian Life
Eesti Elu üksiknumbrid
on müügil Torontos: 

 

  • Eesti Elu kontoris (3 Madison Ave. / 310 Bloor St. W.)
  • e-store'is Toronto Eesti Majas (958 Broadview Ave)
  • Toronto Eesti Maja Kohvikus
  • Leaside Pharmacy's (Suomi Koti juures) 795 Eglinton Ave. E.
  • Hillside Cafe's (594 Mt Pleasant Rd)

  

Telli leht siit!

_________________________________________________________

 

Puhkusteperioodil juulis ja augustis on
Eesti Elu kontor
ESMASPÄEVITI SULETUD!

Ajalehed, mis viiakse lehe ilmumise
päeval Eesti Majja, Eesti Kodusse,
Ehataresse ja müügipunktidesse jõuavad
ümberkorralduste tõttu sel ajavahemikul
kohale tavapärasest hiljem.

 

Tartu College'i ja VEMU sündmused

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930
Eesti Elu - 3 Madison Ave., Toronto, ON M5R 2S2 - Ajalehe Tellimine - Kuulutuste tellimine - Tel: 416-733-4550 - Fax: 416-733-0944 - e-mail: See e-posti aadress on spämmirobotite eest kaitstud. Selle nägemiseks peab su veebilehitsejas olema JavaSkript sisse lülitatud.